Polish Aviation museum
Polish Aviation museum

Polish Air Force Museum Krakow

Krakow is a beautiful city well worth a visit for many reasons. The Polish Aviation Museum is one good reason to go to Krakow, it has a very large collection of Soviet made aircraft that are very well maintained. The museum is easy to reach from the city and has a complete collection displayed both in various hangars and outside. Some of the highlights are an Il-28, MiG-29, Tu-2 plus many Polish aircraft from the Cold War era.

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Polish Air Force Museum
Poland
Krakow
17 Jana Pawla II Street
10 PLN
Mon - Fri 09:00 - 17:00 Sat - Sun 10:00 - 16:00
www.muzeumlotnictwa.pl
Great

Getting there

The Polish Air Force Musuem is easy to find, it takes 20 minutes to get there by tram from the Krakow city centre. Take tram 4 from the city centre and get out at the Wieczysta stop. Walk another 500 meters in the direction where the tram is heading and go left near the museum road sign made from an airplane wing. The museum exists of a main building with a shop, restaurant and exposition area three buildings each with a different theme including a Cold War exposition and an outdoor exposition where a large aircraft collection is displayed... A comprehensive guidebook whit many of the displayed aircraft listed can be brought in the museum shop together with many other aviation books.

Main building of the excellent Polish Aviation Museum in Krakow

Main building

Plan of the outdoor exhibition of the Polish Aviation Museum

Museum leaflet

Polish Aviation Museum guidebook with a complete aircraft overview

Museum guide book

Polish Star 660 truck build from the 1960s to the 1980s

Star 660 truck

Soviet posters in the NATO vs. Warsaw Pact exposition building

NATO vs. Warsaw Pact

Mikoyan Gurevich Design Bureau

The Polish Aviation Museum owns a large number of military aircraft from the Mikoyan Gurevich Design Bureau. The MiGs are lined up in a long row on the back of the museum terrain. The MiG-15UTI Midget is a two seat dual control trainer. The MiG-19PM is a second generation, single-seat, twin jet-engined fighter aircraft armed with 4 Kaliningrad K-5M beam riding missiles. The MiG-21 is the most produced combat aircraft since the Korean War, and it had the longest production run of a combat aircraft, from 1959 to 1985. The Polish aviation museum has 14 MiG-21 fighters on display including many different variants. The MiG-21bis (Nr 9204) represents the ultimate development of this famous Soviet fighter, the MiG-21F-13 (Nr 809) was the first MiG-21 model to be produced in large numbers and the MiG-21MF (Nr 9107) was equipped with RP-22 radar and R13-300 turbojet engine.

Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15UTI Midget two seat dual control trainer

MiG-15UTI

MiG-19PM armed with 4 Kaliningrad K-5M beam riding missiles

MiG-19PM

MiG-21bis the ultimate development of this famous Soviet fighter

MiG-21bis

MiG-21F-13, the first MiG-21 model to be produced in large numbers

MiG-21F-13

A MiG-21MF equipped with RP-22 radar and R13-300 turbojet engine

MiG-21MF

A second MiG-21MF (Nr 6504) is on display equipped with RP-22 radar and R13-300 turbojet engine. The MiG-21M (Nr 2003) is a third generation MiG-21 with RP-21MA radar. The Museum owns two Mig-21PF all-weather interceptors (Nr 1901 and 2004) powered by the R11F2-300 turbojet engine. The MiG-21PFM (Nr 4205) was produced since 1968.

Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-21MF Fishbed export version of the MiG-21SM

MiG-21MF

MiG-21M Fishbed a third generation MiG-21 with RP-21MA radar

MiG-21M

MiG-21PF production version of the all-weather interceptor

MiG-21PF

MiG-21PF Fishbed-D powered by the R11F2-300 turbojet engine

MiG-21PF

MiG-21PFM Fishbed a second generation MiG-21 with RP-21M radar

MiG-21PFM

There is another MiG-21PFM (Nr 01) on display, the PFM is a second generation MiG-21 with RP-21M radar. The MiG-21R (Nr 1125) was produced between 1966 and 1971 and is marked with the emblem of the Polish 32nd tactical reconnaissance regiment. Three MiG-21 aircraft are two seat trainer versions; the MiG-21U (Nr 1217) is the training version of the MiG-21F-13, the MiG-21UM (Nr 9349) is the training version of the MiG-21MF and the MiG-21US (Nr 4401) is an upgraded version of the MiG-21U.

Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-21PFM Fishbed-F produced since 1968

MiG-21PFM

Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-21R Fishbed-H produced between 1966 and 1971

MiG-21R

MiG-21U Mongol-A two seat training version of the MiG-21F-13

MiG-21U

MiG-21UM Mongol-B two seat training version of the MiG-21MF

MiG-21UM

MiG-21US Mongol-B two seat training version upgrade of MiG-21U

MiG-21US

In addition to the MiG-21 variants on display is there also a cut open nose of a MiG-21 where visitors can look inside the aircraft. The front view shows the area where the radar system was located with the sockets for the electronics. The rear view reveals how engine parts are cramped around air inlets. The next generation Mikoyan Gurevich fighter on display is the MiG-23MF used by the Polish Air Force between 1979 and 1996. The most modern military aircraft is the Polish Air Force Mikoyan MiG-29UB Fulcrum-B jet trainer that served under NATO command before donated to the museum.

MiG-21 cockpit displayed so museum visitors can look inside

MiG-21 nose

Cut open front nose of the MiG-21 with electrical system

MiG-21 nose

Cut open MiG-21 front seen from the rear with engine air inlets

MiG-21 nose

MiG-23MF used by the Polish Air Force between 1979 and 1996

MiG-23MF

Polish Air Force Mikoyan MiG-29UB Fulcrum-B jet trainer

MiG-29UB

WSK PZL-Mielec fighters

Next to Mikoyan Gurevich is the Polish WSK PZL-Mielec factory broadly represented in the Polish Aviation Museum. WSK produced a large variety of fighters during Communist times including licence build Mikoyan Gurevich aircraft. The Lim-1 is a licensed build MiG-15, the Lim-2 is a MiG-15bis, the Lim-5 is a MiG-17 and the Lim-5R is a MiG-17F. The Lim-6BIS is a variant on the Lim-5 that was in service in the Polish Air Force until the 1980s.

PZL Mielec WSK Lim-1 Polish licence build MiG-15 from 1953

WSK Lim-1

PZL Mielec WSK Lim-2 trainer licence build MiG-15bis from 1954

WSK Lim-2

PZL Mielec WSK Lim-51 Polish licence build MiG-17 from 1956

WSK Lim-5

WSK Lim-5R licensed MiG-17F build by the Polish Mielec factory

WSK Lim-5R

The Lim-6BIS, a variant on the Lim-5 in service until the 1980s

WSK Lim-6BIS

The WSK Lim-6M with a distinctive looking nose in another Polish variant of the Soviet MiG-17. The Lim-6MR Reconnaissance aircraft a conversion of the Lim-5P. The SBLim-2 and SBLim-2A are two seat training versions of the Lim-2 comparable with the MiG-15UTI. The Polish Aviation Museum has four variants of the PZL TS-11 Iskra a jet trainer that is still in service in the Polish Air Force. The TS-11 was developed for the competition to become the principle jet trainer of the Warsaw Pact Air Forces but was beaten by the Czechoslovak L-29 Delfin. The PZL TS-11 Iskra bis has four pylons to carry various weapon systems.

The WSK Lim-6M in another Polish variant of the Soviet MiG-17

WSK Lim-6M

Wsk Llim-6MR Reconnaissance aircraft a conversion of the Lim-5P

WSK Lim-6MR

Polish build PZL Mielec WSK single engine SBLim-2 jet trainer

WSK SBLim-2

Polish build PZL Mielec WSK single engine SBLim-2A jet trainer

WSK SBLim-2A

PZL TS-11 Iskra bis B trainer with four pylons to carry weapons

PZL TS-11 bis B

The TS-11 Iskra bis DF was a reconnaissance plane in service from 1974. The TS-11 Iskra MR is used by the Polish Bia?o Czerwone Iskry aerobatics team. The TS-11 Iskra R is a naval reconnaissance plane with RDS-81 radar system. The PZL-Mielec I-22 Iryda M-93K was developed as the successor of the TS-11 Iskra in1992, however, the project was cancelled due to lack of funding. The EM-10 Bielik is slick looking Polish military training aircraft prototype that first flown in 2003. The single engine aircraft had a composite fuselage with a light alloy aft section.

PZL TS-11 Iskra bis DF trainer -reconnaissance plane from 1974

PZL TS-11 bis DF

TS-11 Iskra MR from the Bia?o Czerwone Iskry aerobatics team

PZL TS-11 MR

TS-11 Iskra R naval reconnaissance plane with RDS-81 radar system

PZL TS-11 R

Polish PZL-Mielec I-22 Iryda M-93K military jet trainer aircraft

PZL-Mielec I-22

EM-10 Bielik Polish military training aircraft prototype from 2003

EM-10 Bielik

Sukhoi, Yakovlev and Ilyushin Design Bureaus

The Sukhoi, Yakovlev and Ilyushin Design Bureaus are also well represented at the Polish Aviation Museum. Four Sukhoi Su-7 Fitter-A swept wing, supersonic fighter aircraft are displayed at the museum. Two Su-7 aircraft without clear markings are parked on the back end of the museum terrain. The Su-7BM was capable of carrying tactical nuclear bombs. The Su-7UM is the two seat training version of the Su-7BM. The Su-20R Fitter-C attack aircraft of the Polish Air Force is an export version of the Su-17M.

The Su-7 was the main Soviet fighter-bomber aircraft of the 1960s

Sukhoi Su-7

Sukhoi Su-7 Fitter Soviet swept wing supersonic fighter aircraft

Sukhoi Su-7

Sukhoi Su-7BM Fitter-A capable of carrying tactical nuclear bombs

Sukhoi Su-7BM

Sukhoi Su-7UM Fitter two seat training version of the Su-7BM

Sukhoi Su-7UM

Su-20R Fitter-C attack aircraft, an export version of the Su-17M

Sukhoi Su-20R

The Su-22 is another export version of the Su-17 exported to communist and Middle Eastern air forces. The Polish Aviation Museum own three Su-22 aircraft that were in service with the Polish Air Force. The Su-22M4 was the final production version of the Su-22. The Su-22UM3K was the export trainer with AL-21 engine produced between 1978 and 1982. The Sukhoi Su-22M4K on display has the markings of the Polish Air Force 7th Tactical Squadron. The Yakovlev Yak-12 Creek is a light multirole STOL aircraft used by the Soviet Air Force, Soviet civilian aviation and other countries from 1947 onwards. The Yak-17UTI was the Soviets most produced and used early jet trainer introduced just after World War II in 1948.

Sukhoi Su-22M4 export version manufactured from 1983 to 1990

Sukhoi Su-22M4

Su-22UM3K export trainer with AL-21 engine produced 1978-1982

Sukhoi Su-22UM3K

The Sukhoi Su-22M4K Fitter is an export version of the Su-17

Sukhoi Su-22M4K

Yakovlev Yak-12 Creek Soviet light multirole STOL aircraft

Yakovlev Yak-12

Yak-17UTI, the Soviets most produced and used early jet trainer

Yakovlev Yak-17UTI

The Yak-23 Flora was the first jet fighter of the Polish Air Force introduced in 1949 and retired in 1956. The Yak-40 is a small transport aircraft, the museum aircraft was used by the Polish Air Force to transport Polish Communist Party officials. Simular government Yak-40 jets were still present on Warsaw airport in 2011 it is not very likely that high government officials are still using this planes after the crash with the government Tu-154 in 2010 that killed president Lech Kaczynski. The three seat tactical reconnaissance Ilyushin Il-28R Mascot was used by the Polish Air Force from the late 1940s. The Ilyushin Il-28U Mascot was deployed as jet bomber trainer. The Ilyushin Il-14S was developed as a replacement for the DC-3 and its Soviet built version, the Lisunov Li-2. The museum Il-14 was used by the Polish Air Force as transport aircraft.

The Yak-23 Flora was the first jet fighter of the Polish Air Force

Yakovlev Yak-23

Yakovlev Yak-40 used for transporting Polish party officials

Yakovlev Yak-40

Polish three-seat tactical reconnaissance Ilyushin Il-28R Mascot

Ilyushin Il-28R

Polish Air Force Ilyushin Il-28U Mascot jet bomber trainer

Ilyushin Il-28U

Polish Air Force twin-engine transport Ilyushin Il-14s Crate

Ilyushin Il-14S

WSK, Antonov and Tupolev Transport aircraft

Antonov and Tupolev were the main manufacturers of transport aircraft and passengers aircraft in the Warsaw Pact region. The Polish WSK PZL-Mielec plant also tried to produce a propeller passenger aircraft called the MD-12. Only three prototypes were built when LOT decided not to buy the aircraft. The WSK MD-12F from the Polish Aviation Museum was an aerial photography variant, fitted with cameras and other equipment, including a darkroom. The fuselage nose was glazed, with a navigator post. The museum also displays a Tupolev Tu-134A Crusty win-engine airliner that was operated by LOT. Antonov is represented by two aircraft; a An-2 in bad condition without wings and a Polish Air Force An-26 turboprop military transport aircraft.

Polish WSK MD-12F passenger aircraft prototype, never produced

WSK MD-12F

Tupolev Tu-134A Crusty Soviet twin-engine airliner operated by LOT

Tupolev Tu-134A

Front view of the Polish Airlines Tu-134A Crusty passenger jet

Tupolev Tu-134A

Polish Air Force Antonov An-2 in bad condition without wings

Antonov An-2

Polish Air Force An-26 turboprop military transport aircraft

Antonov An-26

Polish and Soviet aircraft of World War II

The Polish Aviation museum owns a large collection of World War II aircraft. The advanced Polish PZL P.11 fighter is the only surviving aircraft of this type and is the pride of the museum collection. The PZL P.11 was designed in the early 1930s and was ahead of its time. The Yakovlev Yak-11 Moose trainer was used after the war and the first aircraft of the museum. The museum has two Yak-18 trainers that were used by the Polish Air Force just directly after the war. The Avia B-33 is a Czech license build Ilyushin Il-10 ground attack aircraft in excellent condition.

The advanced Polish PZL P.11 fighter designed in the early 1930s

PZL P.11

Yakovlev Yak-11 Moose trainer aircraft used from 1947 until 1962

Yakovlev Yak-11

Yak-18 Max Soviet tandem two seat military primary trainer

Yakovlev Yak-18

Polish Air Force Yakovlev Yak-18 Max that entered service in 1949

Yakovlev Yak-18

Polish Air Force Avia B-33, a Czech license build Ilyushin Il-10

Avia B-33

The Lisunov Li-2 Cab displayed outside is a license-built version of the Douglas DC-3. The Li-2 was in dire condition when we visited the museum in 2003 but was fully restored in 2011, credits to the excellent work of the museum! The Polikarpov Po-2NLB is a night bomber is painted for the markings of 2nd Night Bombing Regiment "Krakow" in 1945. This Polish regiment was formed by Soviet Union and it had some Polish aviators involved. Another great looking aircraft is the Tupolev Tu-2S Bat; a high speed Soviet daylight bomber. The PWS-26 was a Polish advanced training aircraft, used from 1937 to 1939 by the Polish Air Force. The LWD TS-9 Junak 3 is a Polish trainer aircraft used from 1952 to 1961.

Lisunov Li-2 Cab, a license-built version of the Douglas DC-3

Lisunov Li-2

Po-2NLB night bomber of 2nd Night Bombing Regiment

Polikarpov Po-2NLB

Tupolev Tu-2S Bat World War II high speed Soviet daylight bomber

Tupolev Tu-2S

Polish PWS-26 advanced training aircraft, used from 1937 to 1939

PWS-26

Polish LWD TS-9 Junak 3 trainer aircraft used from 1952 to 1961

LWD TS-9 Junak 3

Polish aviation history

Many aircraft that were important for the Polish aviation history are part of the collection of the Polish Aviation Museum. One prominently displayed aircraft is the Pieniazek Kukulka of Eugene Lazowski a Polish doctor who saved thousands of Jews during the Holocaust by creating a fake epidemic. The RWD-13 was a Polish touring plane developed in 1935 by the RWD aircraft construction bureau. Around 100 planes were built, the RWD-13 was the biggest commercial success of the RWD. Polish RWD-21 is a two seat touring and sports planes of the late 1930s, only six were build. The LWD Zuraw was a Polish utility and liaison aircraft prototype of 1951 it never entered production. The Zlin Z-26 Trener is a trainer produced by the Czechoslovakian Moravan company from 1949.

The Pieniazek Kukulka of Eugene Lazowski who saved many Jews

Pieniazek Kukulka

Polish RWD-13 touring high wing monoplane produced from 1935

RWD-13

Polish RWD-21 two seat touring and sports planes of the late 1930s

RWD-21

Polish LWD Zuraw utility and liaison aircraft prototype of 1951

LWD Zuraw

Z-26 produced in 1946 by the Czechoslovakian Moravan company

Zlin Z-26 Trener

The PZL TS-8 Bies was a Polish trainer aircraft used from 1957 to 1970. Three Czechoslovakian aircrafts displayed at the Polish Aviation Museum served as air ambulances for remote Polish areas. The Let L-200 Morava air ambulance was build in Kunovice during the 1960s. The great looking Aero Ae-145 was produced between 1959 and 1963 and 162 aircraft were built. The Aero L-60 Brigadyr was STOL utility aircraft was produced from 1954. The PZL M-4 Tarpan was a Polish trainer and sports aircraft prototype of the 1960s, only three prototypes of this aircraft were ever built.

PZL TS-8 Bies Polish trainer aircraft used from 1957 to 1970s

PZL TS-8 Bies BII

Let L-200 Morava air ambulance build in Kunovice Czechoslovakia

Let L-200

Czechoslovakia build Aero Ae-145 aircraft used as air ambulance

Aero AE-145

Aero L-60 Brigadyr propeller Czechoslovakian STOL utility aircraft

Aero l-60 Brigadyr

Polish PZL M-4 Tarpan trainer aircraft prototype of the 1960s

PZL M-4 Tarpan

The PZL-105 Flaming is a Polish short takeoff and landing (STOL) utility aircraft designed by PZL "Warszawa-Ok?cie". Two prototypes were build; the PZL-105L and the PZL-105M both displayed at the Polish Air Force Museum. The Polish PZL-106 Kruk is a crop spraying aircraft produced since 1976. The PZL-130 Orlik is a turboprop trainer used by the Polish navy. The Polish built Mielec M-15 Belphegor was the only jet biplane that ever existed in the world. It was technically flawed and never produced in any significant numbers. The museum M-15 was never picked up by the buyer and brought straight to the museum.

Second prototype of the PZL-105 STOL aircraft developed in 1991

PZL-105L

Polish PZL-105M Flaming prototype STOL aircraft developed in 1989

PZL-105M

Polish PZL-106 Kruk crop spraying aircraft produced since 1976

PZL-106 Kruk

Naval version of the Polish PZL-130 Orlik turboprop trainer

PZL-130 Orlik

Agricultural jet Mielec M-15 was the only jet biplane in the world

PZL Mielec M-15

Helicopters

Many of the Soviet Mil helicopters were license build in Poland, some models were even exclusively build by the WSK PZL plant. The WSK SM-1 is a incensed Mil Mi-1 build in Poland. The WSK-Swidnik SM-2 is a Polish five-seater general purpose helicopter developed from the WSK-Swidnik SM-1W. Three Mil Mi-2FM Hoplite helicopter of the Polish army armed with 57 mm rockets and a 23 mm cannon are lined up on the exposition field. The Mi-2 was produced exclusively in Poland, in the WSK PZL Swidnik factory in Swidnik. Production ended in 1985 after about 7,200 were made. The Mil Mi-2URPP gunship helicopter displayed in one of the hangars is armed with 23mm NS-23 gun. A Mil Mi-2URPP is configured as a chemical reconnaissance smokescreen layer helicopter.

The WSK SM-1 helicopter a incensed Mil Mi-1build in Poland

WSK PZL SM-1

PZL SM-2 light utility helicopter enlarged license-built Mil Mi-1

WSK PZL SM-2

Three Mil Mi-2 helicopters in a row the Mi-2FM is a survey version

Mil Mi-2FM

Mil Mi-2URPP gunship helicopter armed with 23mm NS-23 gun

Mil Mi-2URPP

WSK Mi-2Ch chemical reconnaissance smokescreen layer helicopter

WSK Mi-2Ch

The PZL Swidnik Mi-2 cropduster with an outside container for the pesticides used for agricultural purpose. The museum owns two versions of the Mil Mi-4 Hound, the Mil Mi-4A transport helicopter was used to transport Polish VIP’s. The Mi-4ME is an antisubmarine helicopter used by the Polish navy. The Mil Mi-8S Hip helicopter was used to transport VIPS and Communist party bosses. The Polish SP-GIL GIL helicopter was build as prototype and never entered production.

PZL Swidnik Mi-2 cropduster used for agricultural purpose

PZL Swidnik Mi-2

Mil Mi-4A Hound transport helicopter used to transport VIP’s

Mil Mi-4A

Mil Mi-4ME Hound antisubmarine helicopter used by the Polish navy

Mil Mi-4ME

Mil Mi-8S Hip helicopter used to transport VIPS and party bosses

Mil Mi-8S

Polish SP-GIL helicopter prototype that never entered production

SP-GIL

Polish gliders

The Polish Aviation Museum owns a large collection of gliders mainly hanging on the ceiling inside the main hangar. Most of these gliders were build by the famous Szybowcowy Zaklad Doswiadczalny (SZD) factory now named PZL-Bielsko. The Swift S-1 is a single seat aerobatic glider manufactured in Poland since 1991. The SZD-6Z Nietoperz was an experimental glider aircraft built in 1951. The SZD-8bis Jaskolka is a training two seater glider build in Bielsko-Biala from 1952. The SZD-9bis Bocian 1A was a glider build for aero clubs from 1952. The SZD-10bis Czapla was a Polish glider of which 19 aircraft were build.

Swift S-1 single seat aerobatic glider manufactured since 1991

Swift S-1

Polish SZD-6Z Nietoperz experimental glider aircraft built in 1951

SZD-6Z Nietoperz

Polish SZD-8bis Jaskolka glider build in Bielsko-Bia?a from 1951

SZD-8bis Jaskolka

Polish SZD-9bis Bocian 1A glider build for aero clubs in 1952

SZD-9bis Bocian 1A

Polish SZD-10bis Czapla glider of which 19 aircraft were build

SZD-10bis Czapla

The SZD-15 Sroka glider was build as training aircraft for the Polish army from 1955. The SZD-17X Jaskolka was a high performance competition glider that set many records. The SZD-18 Czajka was designed for Soldiers Friends League in Poland. The SZD-19 2A Zefir 2A build specifically build for the 1958 glider championships. The SZD-22C Mucha Standard is a single seat aerobatic glider.

Polish SZD-15 Sroka glider build for the army from 1955

SZD-15 Sroka

Polish SZD-17X Jaskolka high performance competition glider

SZD-17X Jaskolka

Polish SZD-18 Czajka glider designed for Soldiers Friends League

SZD-18 Czajka

Polish SZD-19 2A Zefir 2A glider build for the 1958 championships

SZD-19 2A Zefir 2A

Polish SZD-22C Mucha Standard single seat aerobatic glider

SZD-22C Mucha

The SZD-27 Kormoran was designed for Polish aeroclubs in 1965, only two were ever built. The IS-B Komar glider was designed and built in Poland from 1947. The SZD-C Zuraw was a training and aerobatic glider built from 1952. The Janowski J-3 Orzel (Eagle) is a motor glider build in Poland. The HWL Pegaz was the first Polish post-war motor glider.

Polish SZD-27 Kormoran two-seat glider designed for aero clubs

PZL Bielsko SZD-27

IS-B Komar glider designed and built in Poland from 1947

IS-B Komar 49

Polish SZD-C Zuraw training and aerobatic glider built from 1952

IS-C Zuraw

Janowski J-3 Orzel (Eagle) motor glider build in Poland

Janowski J-3 Orzel

The HWL Pegaz was the first Polish post-war motor glider

HWL Pegaz

NATO aircraft

The majority of the aircraft of the Polish Aviation Museum are from Soviet, Polish and Czechoslovakia make bud there are also some Western aircraft on display. Highlight from the World War I era are the German Albatros B.II unarmed reconnaissance biplane and the Halberstadt CL.II two seat fighter aircraft. The Hawker Harrier GR.3 was the fist generation aircraft of the Harrier series. An American Cessna A-37B Dragonfly was captured by the North Vietnamese army during the Vietnam War and send to Poland for research purpose. The Republic F-84F Thunderstreak is an American swept wing turbojet fighter-bomber.

Albatros B.II unarmed German World War I reconnaissance biplane

Albatros B.II

Halberstadt CL.II German two seat fighter aircraft of World War I

Halberstadt CL.II

Hawker Harrier GR.3 fist generation aircraft of the Harrier series

Harrier GR.3

American Cessna A-37B Dragonfly captured by the Vietnamese

Cessna A-37B

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak swept wing turbojet fighter-bomber

F-84F

The Ling-Temco-Vought A-7 Corsair II is an American carrier-based attack aircraft. The Swedish SAAB AJSF 37 Viggen fighter and is an attack aircraft produced between 1970 and 1990. The Sepecat Jaguar GR1 is an Anglo French jet ground attack aircraft used by the British and French Air Forces. The French built Mirage 5BA was from the Belgium Air Force. The museum also owns a Northrop F-5E Tiger II that was captured by the North Vietnamese troops and send to Poland for technical research at the Polish Air Force Technical Institute in 1975.

Ling-Temco-Vought A-7 Corsair II carrier-based attack aircraft

A-7 Corsair II

Swedish SAAB AJSF 37 Viggen fighter and attack aircraft

SAAB AJSF 37

Sepecat Jaguar GR1 Anglo-French jet ground attack aircraft

Jaguar GR1

French Dassault Mirage 5 supersonic attack aircraft from the 1960s

Mirage 5BA

Northrop F-5E Tiger II American 1960s supersonic fighter aircraft

F-5E Tiger II

Soviet and Polish aircraft engines

A whole museum building is dedicated to aircraft engines from various countries, technologies and periods. The Shvetsov ASh-62 is radial aircraft engine used for the An-2 and Li-2 propeller aircraft. The Mikulin AM-38F is a 1940s piston engine used in Il-2 and Il-10 aircraft. The Ivchenko-Progress AI-25 is a twin-shaft medium bypass turbofan engine powering the Yakovlev Yak-40 and Aero L-39 Albatros. The Limo VK-1 is Soviet jet engine build for the MiG-15 and MiG-17 jet fighters. The Lyulka AL-7F is a turbojet engine used in the heavy Sukhoi Su-7 and Tupolev Tu-28 fighters.

Shvetsov ASh-62 radial aircraft engine used for the An-2 and Li-2

Shvetsov ASh-62

Mikulin AM-38F 1940s piston engine used in Il-2 and Il-10 aircraft

Mikulin AM-38F

Ivchenko-Progress AI-25 twin-shaft medium bypass turbofan engine

Ivchenko AI-25

Limo VK-1 Soviet jet engine build for the MiG-15 and MiG-17

Klimov VK-1F

Lyulka AL-7F turbojet used in the Sukhoi Su-7 and Tupolev Tu-28

Lyulka AL-7F

The Tumansky R-13F2-300 is a turbojet engine powering various Sukhoi and MiG fighter aircraft. The Tumansky RD-9 was the first Soviet developed turbojet engine powering the Yak-25 and MiG-19 from 1953. The Tumansky RD-10 turbojet engine was used for Su-9 and other fighters. The are also some rocket engines displayed including the Isayev 8D511 engine of the R-11 Scud-B tactical ballistic missile and the Isayev 9D21 engine powering the R-17 Scud-B missile.

Tumansky R-13F2-300 turbojet engine for Sukhoi and MiG aircraft

Tumansky R-13F2-300

The Tumansky RD-9 was the first Soviet developed turbojet engine

Tumansky RD-9B

Tumansky RD-10 turbojet engine used for Su-9 and other fighters

Tumansky RD-10

Isayev 8D511 engine of a R-11 Scud-B tactical ballistic missiles

8D511 Scud engine

Isayev 9D21 engine of a R-17 Scud-B tactical ballistic missiles

9D21 Scud engine

Cockpit gear

A whole variety of jet aircraft exhibits are displayed in the Polish Aviation Museum besides the many aircraft. These include a series of Soviet ejection seats like the KM-1 used in the MiG-21 and the KK-2 used in MiG-17 and MiG-19. The museum also has a special KM-1 ejection seat simulator for training purposes. A Soviet pilot suit with helmet an life jacket from the 1980s is displayed at the Cold War exhibition. A Wuk-90 g-suit for MiG-29 pilots enables flight above 12.000 M.

Soviet KK-2 ejection seat used in MiG-17 and MiG-19 fighters

KK-2 ejection seat

Soviet KM-1 ejection seat used in the Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-21

KM-1 ejection seat

Trainer for a KM-1 ejection set found in the MiG-21 fighter

KM-1 trainer

Soviet pilot suit with helmet an life jacket from the 1980s

Pilot suit

Wuk-90 g-suit for MiG-29 pilots enabling flight above 12.000 M

Wuk-90 pressure suit

Anti Aircraft systems

A small section of the museum terrain between two buildings is dedicated to Soviet Anti Aircraft systems. The S-75 Dvina with NATO name SA-2 Guideline was a widely deployed Soviet surface-to-air guided missile system. This system first gained fame when an S-75 battery shot down the U-2 of Gary Powers over flying the Soviet Union in 1960. The S-75M Volkhov was an improved surface-to-air missile system with a V-750M missile. The Isayev S-125 Neva (NATO reporting name SA-3 Goa) surface-to-air missile system was designed to complement the S-75. It has a shorter range is more effective against more manoeuvrable targets. The 1S91 Straight Flush fire control radar was used for SAM missile system like the S-75 and the S-125. The RSN-75M Fan Song C served as battery command post for the SAM missile fire control team.

S-75 Dvina (SA-2 Guideline) surface-to-air guided missile system

S-75 Dvina

S-75M Volkhov surface-to-air missile system with V-750M missile

S-75M Volkhof

S-125 Neva (SA-3 Goa) dual surface-to-air missile launcher trailer

S-125 Neva

1S91 Straight Flush fire control radar for SAM missile system

1S91 fire control

RSN-75M Fan Song C battery command post for the fire control team

RSN-75M

A WPS-10 radar display manufactured by East German firm Avia-D/Koren can be seen in the Cold War exhibition of the Polish Aviation Museum. Various SAM missiles and missile containers are stored on the museum terrain. The S-75 Dvina is a Soviet-designed high-altitude command guided SAM missile. S-125 Pechora storage container were used to safely store the SA-3 Goa SAM missiles. A GAZ-51 the most produced and best known truck of the USSR is also worth mentioning.

WPS-10 radar display manufactured by East German firm Avia-D/Koren

WPS-10 radar

S-75 Dvina Soviet-designed high-altitude command guided SAM system

SA-2 Guideline

S-125 Pechora storage container for SA-3 Goa SAM missiles

S-125 container

Containers for safe storage of SA-2 and SA-3 SAM missiles

Missile containers

A GAZ-51, the most produced and best known truck of the USSR

Gaz-51 truck

Heavy guns

The Polish Aircraft Museum also has some Soviet Field guns and AA guns from World War II displayed on the terrain. The D-1 Model 1943 is a 152.4 mm howitzer, the ZiS-2 M1943 is 57 mm anti-tank gun and the ZiS-3 M1942 is a 76 mm divisional gun. The M1938 (M-30) is a 121.92 mm howitzer and the M1939 (52-K) is a 85 mm air defence gun.

D-1 Model 1943 Soviet World War II era 152.4 mm howitzer

D-1 howitzer M1943

Soviet ZiS-2 57 mm anti-tank gun M1943 used during World War II

ZiS-2 57

Soviet ZiS-3 76 mm divisional gun M1942 used during World War II

ZiS-3 76

Soviet M1938 (M-30) 121.92 mm howitzer from World War II

M-30 howitzer

Soviet 85 mm air defence gun M1939 (52-K) from World War II

52-K M1939

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